Cherokee Bean Bread

Cherokee Bean Bread - Food Stories Blog Follow Me on Pinterest

Cherokee Bean Bread – Food Stories Blog

I am so excited to bring this adaptation of an authentic Native American dish to you, today. Being that my paternal family heritage is Cherokee Indian, I thought it might be fun to explore some genuine dishes from Native America. This Cherokee Bean Bread (also known as Tsu-Ya-Ga) was one of the first recipes that I found and it just seemed to keep popping up everywhere so I knew that I had to make it.

Cherokee Bean Bread - Food Stories Blog

Cherokee Bean Bread

Other Native American tribes have probably made this recipe; however, my adaptation was from the official site of the Cherokee Nation.

Cherokee Bean Bread - Food Stories Blog Follow Me on Pinterest

Cherokee Bean Bread

For those who might not know, Cherokee Indians were indigenous to the south eastern region of the US that encompasses Georgia & the Carolina’s. In the 1800′s, Cherokee’s were removed from their land and forced to move to new lands in eastern Oklahoma in what is known as the Trail of Tears. My personal family history has been traced back to northern Georgia and my paternal family members did endure the forced movement that led westward. My extended family settled in many places in the Arklahoma area (eastern OK and western AR); though, I now live in southern California.

Me and My Cherokee Dad Celebrating my Birthday

Me and My Cherokee Dad Celebrating my Birthday

Cherokee Bean Bread - Food Stories Blog Follow Me on Pinterest

Cherokee Bean Bread

I had a great time reading through Native American history in the The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America. No surprise, but corn and beans were native to America so it’s no wonder that Cherokees were eating this dish.

Cherokee Bean Bread

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1/2 beaten egg
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/8 tsp pepper
  • 1.5 cups (or one can) pinto beans, drained
  • 2/3 cup frozen corn

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients together (except beans and corn).
  2. Fold in the beans/corn.
  3. Pour into greased, heated 8x8 pan.
  4. Bake at 400 for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Recipe adapted from the official site of the Cherokee Nation

http://foodstoriesblog.com/2012/09/20/cherokee-bean-bread/

Regular readers of Food Stories will immediately notice that this dish has not been tinkered with to decrease the carbs. Although I do have Type 2 Diabetes and I do count carbs, I didn’t have the heart to take the carbohydrates out of this traditional recipe. It just has to much meaning to me.

Cherokee Bean Bread - Food Stories Blog Follow Me on Pinterest

Cherokee Bean Bread

Here are some other versions you might enjoy …

Library of Congress – Cherokee Indian Bean Bread
The United Cherokee Nation – Bean Bread
New Tribal Dawn – Cherokee Bean Bread
United Cherokee Ani-Yun-Wiya Nation – Cherokee – Bean Bread or Tsu-Ya-Ga
War Eagle Mill - Cherokee Bean Bread

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What do you think?

  1. Thats a very interesting bread recipe, looks similar to some Asian one where we use red beans
    Raymund recently posted … Clam ChowderMy Profile

  2. so fun to read about your heritage + what a cool bread! sounds wonderful
    amy recently posted … apple cinnamon breadMy Profile

  3. Thanks so much for sharing a little of your heritage! What an interesting background. I do love this bread with the beans and corn! It has lots of soul and very connected to the earth. I can’t wait to make it! I live in an area surrounded by reservations so I’m going to have to do some research and see if there is a variation of this bread amongst the Native Americans in New Mexico.
    mjskit recently posted … Grilled Meat and Late Summer Vegetable Salad by NadalynMy Profile

  4. this bread is so different than the usual breads. the addition of beans is fantastic! it’s wonderful that you made something from your heritage and that picture of you and your dad is soooooo cute!

  5. very intriguing! love digging up recipes with such meaning, and i agree, there’s definitely certain ones that I don’t mess around with :)

  6. I love the story. So nice to get to know blogger’s history and origins of their food choices. I’ve never had bean bread but I’m sure I would like this and beans are so healthy that I try to incorporate them into our diets daily. Thanks for sharing!
    Anita at Hungry Couple recently posted … Pear CosmoMy Profile

  7. I absolutely love this bread and that it is part of your heritage :D

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru
    Choc Chip Uru recently posted … The Final Guest Post: Double Chocolate Coconut MuffinsMy Profile

  8. I didn’t know you were Cherokee! Your dad has all the classic features though……….I’m from over by Tahlequah – Tribal Capitol of the Cherokee and where Tsa-La-gi is located. I’ve had bean bread many times generally in the spring when the Indian Baptist Church (that’s its real name) has wild onions and eggs with grape dumplings also traditional Cherokee food and we LOVE those! :) My daughter (Choctaw) was just asking if I knew how to make them the other day because she hasn’t had any since we moved to this side of the state. Now you’ve made me hungry for bean bread!
    kalamitykelli recently posted … 4 Ingredient ParadiseMy Profile

  9. First of all, I think it’s so cool that you went back to your roots and made this. I also like that you didn’t play around with the recipe – even with Diabetes, if every once in a while you treat yourself to a “real” piece of bread, you can still maintain a healthy weight, diet, and glucose levels. Food is about so much more than basic survival/necessity. This also looks like a really interesting recipe – I know my family would turn up their noses at it (not a bean family!) but you can bet I’m bookmarking it anyway!
    Jess recently posted … (Vegetarian) Mexican Stuffed Sweet PotatoMy Profile

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